“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” is not as good as we hoped

By Henry Pierce

Staff Writer

WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD — YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!

As the first order is taking the final steps to crush the Resistance, a message is intercepted by a Resistance spy telling that the long-dead Palpatine is alive and ready to take over once again. The Resistance decides that it needs to stop Palpatine, and they go on a long adventure to find support and recruit people to their cause. Once they do, it looks like nobody wants to help them so they go by themselves.

Once they get a readout of the ships Palpatine is using, it turns out that they are mini-death-star ships and, of course, there is some cheap way to destroy them: apparently ships cannot use shields in the atmosphere even though ships have been seen doing this in almost every movie and TV show. 

The few ships the Resistance got together (which apparently can’t use shields because it’s against the rules in the atmosphere — instead they use plot armor) and start destroying the entire fleet of mini-death-stars (which of course have a fatal flaw that lets a single ship destroy it in one shot if they hit the reactor or something like that). Then it turns out the emperor had WAY more ships and, when all seems lost, a random assortment of Resistance ships jumps into the battle, somehow coordinating the attack all at once with no leader or anything. 

Meanwhile, Rey and Kylo Ren are facing off the emperor in his creepy cave with a bunch of Sith cultists that are singing in the background. Here Palpatine tells Rey that she is his granddaughter and that, if she killed him, his soul would take over her body (why did he tell her this right before she killed him I do not know because then she refused to kill him). 

The movie ends when Palpatine throws Kylo Ren off a cliff that was conveniently there for the plot. Then, Palpatine uses lightning on Rey and, when she is about to die, Kylo Ren climbs up from his cliff. He then kills Palpatine and uses his life force to heal Rey. They kiss, and then he dies.

The purpose of the film is to provide closure and put an end to the Star Wars saga. It did its job, but it left viewers not fully satisfied because of all the plot holes and half-explained new things brought into the movie that almost seem on a whim.

One of the main reasons it did not achieve its purpose is because the seventh movie was made by J.J. Abrams, the eighth made by Rian Johnson and the ninth by J.J. Abrams again. Both people had different ideas for what to do with the series, and it really destroyed the flow.

This movie is pretty bad compared to other films in the franchise. There were so many reasons why I personally didn’t like it. One was: the bad guy in the movie had prepared for SO LONG, but the hero’s plot armor was too strong for even the largest army. 

Another thing that bothered me was the complete lack of continuity between the three movies. The seventh acted like a buildup movie; then with the change of directors, Johnson made another setup movie, which forced the ninth movie to be rising action and climax, which didn’t really work out.

One thing that was disappointing was the obvious lack of a plan that Disney had going into making it; they didn’t know what they were going to have as sequels, and it was badly planned. Another thing was SPACE HORSES. There was a scene where the people rode out onto the top of a star destroyer on horses.

Some strengths that the movie had were the amazing visuals and great music. Another was the development of the character Kylo Ren, whose story was consistent throughout the whole three movies. 

In conclusion, the movie was pretty bad, with so much stuff reminding me of kids making “new rules” in playground games. It was also very apparent that the directors of all three sequel movies had no plan or even an outline for the story, so it felt really weird watching them. 

Featured image (at the top of this post): This is the official logo of the latest Star Wars movie. PHOTO CREDIT: Wikimedia Commons

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